Venison French Onion Soup Recipe

Venison French Onion Soup Recipe

Onions and venison complement each other tremendously. I hadn’t seen a recipe for this before, but I like to make French onion soup at least a couple of times per year, and with a deep freezer full of venison, I’m always trying to think of new ways to utilize it. And so, my version of venison French onion soup came to be. Ingredients 4 onions, thinly sliced 1/2 cup butter (if you use salted butter, just add less salt at the end) roughly 2 tablespoons minced garlic (to taste) about 1 pound of venison, cubed (you can use tougher meat, since this will cook in a crock pot for many hours) 4 – 6 cups beef broth (add more or less depending on the consistency you like) 1 cup red wine (I like the flavors of Shiraz with this) venison seasoning (if you have it) OR thyme and pepper salt, to taste 1 crusty baguette white cheese (Gruyere, if you want to throw down the cash, otherwise swiss will also do the trick) parsley Directions Melt the butter in a fry pan over medium-high heat, and fry the venison until browned (several minutes). Remove the venison, and leave the remaining butter in the pan. Fry the onions and garlic until soft and browned (several minutes). Transfer the venison, and onions and garlic to a crock pot. Add the beef broth and red wine. Let cook on low for 6 – 8 hours (this will help the meat become more tender). After the concoction has cooked long enough, add seasoning to taste (you will have to taste it). Don’t over-season, you can always add more later. Before serving, put the soup into oven-safe bowls. Put slices of the baguette on top, and then add the slices of cheese. Sprinkle with parsley. Put in the oven and broil until the cheese is brown and bubbling. Serve immediately, and handle with caution (the bowls and soup will be HOT!)....

Wild Game Recipes – Venison Pot Pie

Wild Game Recipes – Venison Pot Pie

This is wild game comfort food at its best, and one of my most popular dinner recipes. Venison pot pie is a versatile dish; I hardly ever make it with exactly the same ingredients, but there are several constants. Experiment with the vegetables and seasonings as much as you like. The recipe below is my standard venison pot pie that always gets rave reviews. Enjoy! Ingredients for Venison Pot Pie About 2 lbs of cubed venison meat 1 large onion, diced About 1 cup of carrots, diced About 1 cup of peas, minced (just kidding, you can leave them whole) 3 medium-sized potatoes, chopped *if you want to add celery to your pot pie, that’s your prerogative, but I despise celery and it has no place in any of my recipes 1 cup beef broth 1 cup red wine flour as needed – at least 1/2 cup Venison or wild game seasoning, if you have it (a variety of brands are available, but I prefer Cabela’s Wild Game seasoning) Canola oil – at least a couple of tablespoons pre-made pie crust (I don’t recommend spending the time to make your own! It takes a long time and is not worth the frustration of rolling it out). 1 egg white parsley Directions 1) Heat up canola oil in a large skillet over medium to medium-high heat. Add the venison and let it brown on all sides, stirring as needed – about 5 minutes. 2) Add the onions, potatoes, and carrots (if you are using raw carrots). Stir, and cook until they begin to soften. This should take 5 – 10 minutes. 3) Add the broth, wine, and peas. Bring the mixture to a boil. 4) Turn the heat down to a simmer and gently stir in flour until the mix reaches a consistency that you are pleased with. It should be viscous and thick, with bubbles slowly poofing through the mix. Add the seasoning at this point, seasoning to taste (you’ll need to taste it – use clean spoons and don’t over-season!) 5) When you are happy with the consistency (make sure it’s not liquidy), let the mixture simmer for 20 – 25 minutes, stirring occasionally. It should simmer long enough to let the potatoes become soft enough to be edible. 6) While the mixture is simmering, preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. 7) Lightly grease a pie tin and place the bottom pie crust in it. *Tip – let the pre-made pie crusts sit out on the counter for about 15 minutes before using them so they work with you better. 8) Let the pot pie mix cool down for at least 5 minutes before transferring it into the pie tin, otherwise it has a tendency to make the upper pie crust too soft. 9) Place the top pie crust on top, folding the edges together with the bottom pie crust to form a seal. Cut pretty slices in the top of the crust with a knife (as seen in my photo) to aid with baking. 10) Use a brush to apply egg white to the top of the pie; this will help it to attain that beautiful browned bakery look (you can do this with any other pie you make too). Sprinkle the top of the pie with dried parsley to make it look even more attractive. 11) Bake the pot pie for about 20 – 30 minutes, until the top looks nice and browned. Remember, the inside is already cooked, so you can judge “doneness” based on how the top looks. 12) After removing the pie from the oven, let it sit for at least 5 minutes before cutting into it – this will help the inside fall apart less once you cut into it. Take photos, and bring people in to admire it during this time of...

Easy Venison Teriyaki Marinade Recipe

Easy Venison Teriyaki Marinade Recipe

Teriyaki augments the flavor of venison very well, in my opinion. In fact, one of my go-to recipes when I’m in a bit of a rush is this simple recipe for venison teriyaki marinade. Although I enjoy very tender cuts of venison on their own with minimal seasoning, I usually prefer to have a complimentary flavor accompany the taste of venison. Marinading venison in a mixture such as the one I am about to impart to you makes the meat more tender and of course, more flavorful. Make sure to remove any fatty or silvery tendon bits before marinading your venison. Since this meat should be grilled or fried, I would not choose a tough cut of meat for this recipe. Save those for recipes that will be slow cooked, such as stews or chilis. Ingredients 1/2 cup teriyaki sauce 1/2 cup olive oil 1/4 cup soy sauce 1 tsp ground ginger 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar Optional sprinkle of crushed red pepper The soy sauce and rice wine vinegar in this recipe really help to cut into the gamey taste of your venison. Let your meat soak in this marinade for at least 8 hours, a day is...

Backpacking Food Ideas – Fried Tortillas with Toppings

Backpacking Food Ideas – Fried Tortillas with Toppings

Eating oatmeal or cold granola for breakfast every day while you’re backpacking sucks, at least for me. I like a meal that’s hot! Crispy! Adaptable! Simple! Compact and lightweight! Does not have to be kept cold! And of course, produces as few dishes as possible. These criteria cut out a lot of foods, but you know what they don’t cut out? ¡Tortillas! Yes, it’s true, tortillas are a fantastic choice if you’re looking for backpacking food ideas.   It took a couple of years to conceive of the idea. In those years, we brought bagels, english muffins, or bread. Foolish! Sure, they’re fine if you’re camping out of your car with coolers, totes, and miscellaneous whatnot, but we don’t really do that. We go backpacking, for a week at a time. Space is a concern, and stuff gets squished. Backpacking Food Ideas – The Tortilla Enter tortilla. It is versatile. You can stuff it with rice and meat. You can add seasonings to bagged chicken and toss that in there (buffalo chicken wrap, anyone?), and HELLO, fish tacos! Now let’s switch gears to breakfast backpacking food ideas. The lone tortilla. Eat it cold, or eat it hot. Put stuff on it. May I suggest peanut butter? Nutella? General fixings one would spread on toast? You can heat your tortilla, it’s easy! Grab your camp stove, a pan, a utensil for flipping it, and some oil. I like canola oil, but you can use other kinds. Heat up the oil in the pan and fry your tortilla. The key is to just use a little oil so you can achieve the ultimate goal – crispy brown fry spots on the tortilla. You know what I’m talking about. Find On Sale Camping & Hiking products at...

Simple Venison Stroganoff Recipe

Simple Venison Stroganoff Recipe

This venison stroganoff recipe earned me the pleasing compliment of “you’re going to make me fat” from my husband. This actually isn’t the most fattening thing I cook, but the quantity of the meal that my husband shoveled down his throat was rather prodigious. He would get fat if he kept up that pace every night. This recipe is great for a weeknight, or a weekend. If you are in a hurry, like I was tonight, take a shortcut by using a stroganoff pasta mix such as the one made by Bear Creek. If you are making weekend stroganoff, or simply have more time to spare, here is a great recipe for the stroganoff base: Ingredients: one package egg noodles, cooked (or cooked potatoes, or mashed potatoes, or rice, or bread) – whatever you use, this needs some kind of starchy base to be poured onto one large onion, diced 1 small package mushrooms (or as many or few mushrooms as you want) butter 1 clove garlic, peeled and minced 1 pound venison loin, fat and sinews removed, cut into bite-sized pieces 1 8-ounce container of sour cream splash of brandy salt and freshly ground black pepper – or Venison Seasoning Prepare noodles according to package directions (or prepare your other base, such as mashed potatoes). Meanwhile, fry the diced onion in butter (use canola oil for a more healthy option). Temporarily remove the onions from the pan.  Season the venison with the salt and pepper, or the venison seasoning. Turn up the heat in the fry pan and add more butter or canola oil. Add the mushrooms and cook for a couple of minutes until they start to brown. Add the garlic and venison and sear for a few minutes, turning the meat chunks occasionally.   Add the splash of brandy – if you would like to, light it on fire! Only do it if you can do so safely. Add the sour cream and simmer for a couple of minutes. Pour this mixture over the egg noodles and enjoy! If you choose to make the “weeknight” option, prepare the stroganoff mix according to package directions while the onions, mushrooms, and venison are frying. Add the extras to the stroganoff mix when both are complete. For some venison goodies, check out the links below. I use The Complete Venison Cookbook all the time and can attest to its greatness. <A HREF=”http://ws.amazon.com/widgets/q?rt=tf_cw&ServiceVersion=20070822&MarketPlace=US&ID=V20070822%2FUS%2Fwilderwaypoi-20%2F8010%2F1b81c2c2-5bb0-4495-b309-85dcc340b43c&Operation=NoScript”>Amazon.com...

Backpacking Fare: Dried Mushrooms

Backpacking Fare: Dried Mushrooms

  When planning meals for a backpacking trip, it’s nice to be able to work in some variety.   If you are going on a longer trip, this is especially true, and lightweight foods are essential. For everyday cooking at home I prefer fresh mushrooms over dried, but things have a way of tasting so much more amazing after a day in the outdoors. Dried mushrooms are OUTSTANDING after a long hike! Dried mushrooms lend an earthy, meaty taste to a meal, and make a nice addition to soups, noodles, rice, or grains. With the right seasonings, you could even serve them up as a side dish!  We always take them on our trips to the Boundary Waters. Cooking tips for dried mushrooms: If you have the luxury of time, soak the mushrooms in hot water before cooking them (use purified water!). The beauty of this is the water you soaked the mushrooms in makes an excellent base for soup, or can subsequently be used to boil noodles in. If you like softer mushrooms, dice them up before cooking them. We often like to leave them be; it’s fun to be able to easily identify the different mushroom types as you eat them (if you happen to be using a variety of dried mushroom types). It will take longer to cook your mushrooms if you leave them whole – plan your cooking timing accordingly. The rehydrated mushrooms can be sautéed in cooking oil (we prefer canola). The addition of dried, minced onions makes for an irresistible aroma when...