How to Use an Emergency Fire Starter

How to Use an Emergency Fire Starter

Emergency fire starters are typically made with magnesium, and most have built-in blades or knives. Basically, you will first need to shave bits of magnesium off the fire starter with a knife onto some tinder. The flint from the fire starter is then used to create sparks, which should ignite the flammable magnesium as well as the tinder. From there, it’s your job to keep the fire going! Read further for more detailed instructions.   This emergency fire starter, for example, has a striker with one serrated edge rather than a knife. The serrated edge is used to shave off the bits of magnesium, and then the flint is struck with the other side of the striker. How to Use an Emergency Fire Starter – Detailed Instructions Before you even think about making your little pile of magnesium shavings, you will need to gather dry tinder and assemble it into a nice little airy pile in a location where you will want your fire to be. Your tinder could be anything from twigs to bark to fuzz from your clothing, and will be used as fuel to ignite larger pieces of burnable fuel. When you start to shave off the bits of magnesium onto the tinder, hold the starter at an angle above the tinder. Try scraping toward you rather than away to have greater control over where the shavings land. You should create a pile that is about the size of a quarter, and it should land directly on the tinder. Your emergency fire starter will also have a flint component. This may be on the same block as the magnesium, or it could be on a separate one. Use the blade portion of the fire starter to scrape down the flint in order to create sparks. Make sure you are once again holding the flint at an angle so that the sparks land on the flammable magnesium and tinder. Continue to strike the flint until the sparks have lit the fuel and started a flame. From there, it is your job to nurture the flame into a fire! Protect this little flame from strong wind, but do gently blow on it to encourage the flame to spread. Slowly add more tinder, and then progressively larger bits of fuel as the fire grows. Zippo Emergency Fire Starter Kit This fire starter kit is available at REI and includes a¬†flint-wheel ignition and 4 waxed tinder sticks to help you get a fire going. It also helpfully floats in water and has a waterproof...

Venison French Onion Soup Recipe

Venison French Onion Soup Recipe

Onions and venison complement each other tremendously. I hadn’t seen a recipe for this before, but I like to make French onion soup at least a couple of times per year, and with a deep freezer full of venison, I’m always trying to think of new ways to utilize it. And so, my version of venison French onion soup came to be. Ingredients 4 onions, thinly sliced 1/2 cup butter (if you use salted butter, just add less salt at the end) roughly 2 tablespoons minced garlic (to taste) about 1 pound of venison, cubed (you can use tougher meat, since this will cook in a crock pot for many hours) 4 – 6 cups beef broth (add more or less depending on the consistency you like) 1 cup red wine (I like the flavors of Shiraz with this) venison seasoning (if you have it) OR thyme and pepper salt, to taste 1 crusty baguette white cheese (Gruyere, if you want to throw down the cash, otherwise swiss will also do the trick) parsley Directions Melt the butter in a fry pan over medium-high heat, and fry the venison until browned (several minutes). Remove the venison, and leave the remaining butter in the pan. Fry the onions and garlic until soft and browned (several minutes). Transfer the venison, and onions and garlic to a crock pot. Add the beef broth and red wine. Let cook on low for 6 – 8 hours (this will help the meat become more tender). After the concoction has cooked long enough, add seasoning to taste (you will have to taste it). Don’t over-season, you can always add more later. Before serving, put the soup into oven-safe bowls. Put slices of the baguette on top, and then add the slices of cheese. Sprinkle with parsley. Put in the oven and broil until the cheese is brown and bubbling. Serve immediately, and handle with caution (the bowls and soup will be HOT!)....

Early Morning in the BWCA

Some peaceful scenery. Sit back, relax, and imagine yourself into the...

Early Morning Fishing in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Early morning fishing in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. We were catching rock bass after rock bass in shallow water using...

The Joys of Scat Identification

The Joys of Scat Identification

It would not be unusual to find me outside, taking photos of poop. Maybe poking through it with a stick. Whether you think it’s a disgusting practice or not, one can glean a lot of information from crap. Firstly, and most interestingly, it can tell you what kind of animal has passed by. Hunters, for example, get super pumped when they happen across certain types of dung (generally when it belongs to the species of animal they are hunting). Secondly, it can give you some clues as to what the animal was eating. The shape, color, and size of the droppings can change with the animal’s diet. ¬†Sometimes it may be obvious what the animal was eating; you may be able to find seeds that you can identify, hairs, or bones. You may be able to tell if the animal has been eating a good deal of fruit. This is helpful if you’re trying to find that species of animal because you can look for the types of food it has been eating in an attempt to find it. Scat may also be able to give you clues about which direction the animal was traveling in. Sometimes animals may walk and poo at the same time, leaving a trail of “breadcrumbs” for us to follow, if you will. Or, if all the turds are in one pile, just bend down and touch your tongue to it to determine the direction of travel. … You didn’t really fall for that one, did you? You may be able to tell if the droppings are fresh. If it’s cold out, they could be steaming and indicate that the animal had passed by frequently. Or, they could be starting to deteriorate, indicating that the poop is not fresh, or perhaps that it has rained since the scat was deposited. Scat Identification Were you able to identify what kind of animal left the pile of scat in the photo above? Let me give you a hint – it was found in the Minnesota woods, in a mix of young growth and older growth forest. Here’s another hint. Take a look at the whitish tint a lot of the turds have on them. This may remind you of other animals that make whitish poop…birds! If you can’t tell the size of the droppings, they are about an inch in length. This indicates a larger bird. Ok, if you haven’t figured it out by now, I’ll let you off the hook. It’s Ruffed Grouse...